First Assignment: Light, Shape, Shadow and Line

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Essential Questions: 

  • What design elements make a photographic image compelling?
  • How can one design an image specifically for a black and white medium?
  • In the photographic darkroom, which negatives make the best fine prints? What are their specific qualities?

Directions

  • Shoot 1 roll of film. Second roll may be given after the first is developed. 
  • Subject and location are up the the photographer, but the images should be visually compelling and use these four elements specifically: light, line, shadow and shape. Experiment, look for bold or subtle examples around you. See the slideshow, which you can download at the bottom of this post, for examples.  
  • make a contact sheet
  • make at least five 5×7” prints.
  • make one 11×14” print of your best image (your teacher will help you choose what to print)

Slideshow (shown in class): 

Light Shape Shadow & Line Lecture advanced

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Film Clip Presentation

First Assignment: Film Clip Presentation

kane-borges

 Essential Question: What makes a movie “good?” What are the pieces of a “good” movie?

Directions:

  1. Decide whether you are going to present on your own or with a partner. 
  2. Alone or with your partner, choose one or two 3-5 minute clips from a movie, TV show, or short film –something you feel the class needs to see. Think carefully about which film and which clip(s) you choose to show. Th clip(s) should represent the film you are showing (ie give us a good idea of the style of the film, and what the filmmaker is doing. You will be encouraged to choose something the majority of the students in class have not seen. Look for something classic or independent.
  3. Write a short paragraph (3-5 sentences) about each of the elements of cinema, below.
  4. Present the film clip to class. Plan, rehearse and deliver your thoughts on the clip. Put your clip in context of the longer movie (etc) that it comes from–where does it fit? Overall, tell us why you chose this piece of media and why WE should see it too.

Analyze the following elements of cinema in your presentation:

  • Storytelling (The Script / Writing: Plot, Beginning / middle/end – structure; Dialog; Characters; the IDEA)
  • Acting & Directing
  • Mise En Scene (‘What you see’ – Locations; props, costumes; makeup)
  • Cinematography (Shots: Composition, Lighting, Viewpoint / Perspective / Angle; Movement)
  • Soundtrack (Music score; Mix; Compliments visuals and story;
  • Editing (Tells the story; special effects; continuity; pacing)

Delivering your presentation. You have some choices:

  1. You may choose to introduce the film to put the clip into context for the class, then let the clip show in it’s entirely before delivering your analysis.
  2. You can talk while your clip is playing, starting and stopping at times to point things out to us.
  3. After your introduction, you can play the clip through once, then play it through a second time, pointing out elements of the film you want us to notice (this works better with a shorter clip, say 3 minutes).
  4. You can find your own way to present and lecture on this film that combines the approaches listed below.

Download the rubric here:  Film Clip Presentation rubric