Photograms

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Objectives:

–Learn about the darkroom–procedures and technology (enlargers, chemistry, paper, exposure)

–Play with design — positive and negative space, opacity, designing within the frame

–Create meaning through the selection and arrangement of objects you find or bring in.

–Work individually to design 3 photograms

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Download the lecture (which contains examples, hints and the assignment) here: photogram lecture

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Portrait Assignment

Students in Introduction to photography will explore taking portraits of people–people they care about and people they’ve never met before, but want to.

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Kurt Cobain by Mark Seliger

Students will also shoot studio style portrait a friend acting out an emotion or idea.

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Actress Meryl Streep by Annie Leibovitz, 1981

Download and read the slideshow from class for more examples and information about the assignment:

Portrait Assignment Lecture

Place Assignment

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New York circa 1932. “Night view, Manhattan.” Photo by Berenice Abbott (1898- 1991)

Due for Critique (Thursday October 27):

  • 6 or more 5×7” prints
  • A typed paragraph (5-7 sentences) describing why you chose this place (visually why it interested you; why it’s important). Include in your paragraph:
    • Where you photographed
    • What caused you to choose this location – why is it important?
    • What you saw when you arrived; what you chose to photograph and why
    • How your images all together tell the viewer about this place. Are you happy with the results?
    • Include your name
    • Print in 14 or 16 point font (so we can read it on the wall)

Assignment Goals:
* Explore a place outside of your house or school
* Choose a place with visual interest to you: look for shapes, shadows, textures, angles, patterns
* Choose a place that has meaning: a street, a barn, a bridge, a place of worship, a field, a stream, a forest, a graveyard, a factory, a room–inside, outside, rural or urban!
* Shoot one entire roll at the location. Get some wide shots (far back) and close ups (details). Play with composition and design.
* If the light isn’t right you may want to return when it is better.
* Try to get just the place. If people are in it, they should be apart of the place, not the main subject.

Download the Place Assignment Lecture (with examples) here: 

Lecture – Place Assignment

Photograms

photogram lecture.024

Objectives:

–Learn about the darkroom–procedures and technology (enlargers, chemistry, paper, exposure)

–Play with design — positive and negative space, opacity, designing within the frame

–Work individually to design 2 photograms.

–Work in a group of two or three, with the assistance of your teacher or TA, to create one large format (16×20 inch) photogram with both design and meaning. Options:

  • A life-sized portrait (head) of one of your group members or another person using found objects
  • A “map” or diagram that shows a personal destination or the path to get there
  • A political (or propaganda) poster that makes a statement about war, the refugee crisis, global warming, education reform, bullying, free music or another newsworthy topic that matters to you

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Download the lecture (which contains examples, hints and the assignment) here: photogram lecture

Light, Shape, Shadow and Line

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Essential Questions: 

  • What design elements make a photographic image compelling?
  • How can one design an image specifically for a black and white medium?
  • In the photographic darkroom, which negatives make the best fine prints? What are their specific qualities?

Directions

  • Shoot 1-2 rolls of film. 
  • Must be shot off campus (outside of school)
  • Subject and location are up the the photographer, but the images should be visually compelling and use these four elements specifically: light, line, shadow and shape. Experiment, look for bold or subtle examples around you. See the slideshow, which you can download at the bottom of this post, for examples.  
  • make a contact sheet
  • make at least five 5×7″ prints.
  • make one to two 8×10″ prints of your best image(s) (your teacher will help you choose what to print)

Slideshow (shown in class): 

Light Shape Shadow, Line and Text Lecture Intro

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Photography Book Reviews

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Two Books of Astronomy, 1996. Abelardo Morell

Objectives:

  • Look at photography books in the classroom. You can look at any of the photography books.
  • Find books that are compelling, share with classmates, or ask your teacher for recommendations based on genre (type of photos). Explore a variety of photographers and image making techniques, based on student interest.
  • Write a one paragraph review of each book with, highlighting one or more images that you found particularly compelling.
  • Share your google document with your teacher.

Assignment:

  1. You will look at many images, but are required to write a review of three images of your choice, from three different books.
  2. Use your laptop while browsing books. A google doc has been provided to get you started on the Classroom post.
  3. Explore books. Take several off the shelf that interest you. Feel free to share with friends in the class (recommend books to each other).
  4. Review the book and photographer. For each image:
    1. Take note of the photographer and book title. Also, take note of the page number.
    2. What is happening in the image? What is the subject? What’s happening? Where are we? Where is the photographer in relation to the subject.
    3. What does the photo communicate to you? Meaning? Feeling? Mood?
    4. Is this the kind of photo you’d like to make? Or just appreciate? Describe.
  5. Plan to share your favorite images with the class.

Darkroom Experiments

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 “Seeing Life Through Rose-Coloured Spectacles” by Amandine Roche

PAINTING WITH DEVELOPER

Selectively applying developer to photographic paper – by dripping, splattering, sponging and painting it – can enhance the meaning of the image or create new meaning. These graphic, one-of-of a kind images reverse the positive and negative space, add a dynamic sense of movement, and create complex, high-contrast borders. As with all photography, what the photographer decides to reveal or obscure in their photograph is very telling. Equally important: these photographs are fun to make.

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SANDWICHING NEGATIVES 

Layering two negatives on top of each other in the enlarger can create fantastic double images. See the lecture here:

Double Negatives lecture